Agile SDLC Q&A with Chris Eng and Ryan O’Boyle – Part II

Welcome to another round of Agile SDLC Q&A. Last week Ryan and I took some time to answer questions from our webinar, “Building Security Into the Agile SDLC: View from the Trenches“; in case you missed it, you can see Part I here. Now on to more of your questions! Q. What would you recommend […]

Agile SDLC Q&A with Chris Eng and Ryan O’Boyle – Part I

Recently, Ryan O’Boyle and I hosted the webinar “Building Security Into the Agile SDLC: View From the Trenches”. We would like to take a minute to thank all those who attended the live broadcast for submitting questions. There were so many questions from our open discussion following the webinar that we wanted to take the […]

Introducing the iOS Reverse Engineering Toolkit

It should be the goal of every worker to expend less time and energy to achieve a task, while still maintaining, or even increasing, productivity. As an iOS penetration tester, I find myself repeating the same manual tasks for each test. Typing out the same commands to run various tools that are required to help […]

Security Headers on the Top 1,000,000 Websites: March 2014 Report

The March 2014 report is going to be a bit different than those in the past. This is primarily due to architectural changes that were made to get more precise data in less time. Additionally, a lot of work has been done to automate generation of these reports so they can be released more often. […]

Guidelines for Setting Security Headers

As part of our Alexa Top 1 Million Security Headers post series(Nov 2012 – Mar 2013 – Nov 2013,) it is not uncommon to have to go back and re-read specifications to determine which header values are valid. While there are numerous sites that detail the various headers and what they do, there isn’t a […]

Reversing Kony JavaScript iOS Applications

Researched by William Spires and Stephen Jensen. That Was Then, This is Now Just five short years ago, if you wanted to create an iOS application, you had to either take a crash course in Objective-C programming or hire someone to create the application for you. It was truly the beginning of a mobile revolution, […]

Do Not Pass QA, Do Not Goto Fail: Catching Subtle Bugs In The Act

Bugs happen. Severe bugs happen. Catastrophic bugs happen. There’s simply no way to know how, exactly, the Goto Fail Bug – a tiny mistake which happened to disable an entire step of SSL verification deep in Apple code – ended up getting written into sslKeyExchange.c and saved. What is clear is that the bug got through Apple’s QA process unnoticed and ultimately shipped on iOS and OSX. Let’s consider for a moment that this bug was committed to your codebase during routine refactoring. How certain are you, really, that you would catch it? What can we do to improve the likelihood it will be caught?

Sharing on iDevices: Apple Opens it Up

In their latest OS release, iOS 7, Apple allows for a number of mechanisms to share data, both in the form of files or streaming data. Two of these mechanisms highlight some of the different design choices Apple has made and will likely continue to make in the SDK.

Golang’s Context Aware HTML Templates

Golang is a new open source programming language that is growing in popularity. Since I am getting bored of Python, I decided to begin studying it. While I’m really enjoying it as a language, I was completely caught off guard when I started reading about Golang’s built in HTML templating package. I noticed in their […]

Security Headers on the Top 1,000,000 Websites: November 2013 Report

It has been almost exactly a year since we conducted the first top 1 million security headers report so it is a great time to re-run the analysis and see how well security header adoption is growing. As before, the latest Chrome and Firefox User-Agent strings were used to make requests to the top 1 million sites over both HTTP and HTTPS. Out of the 2,589,918 responses we had over 100,000 distinct security headers and values to analyze.

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